Only one month into the new year, 12 states have pending legislation that would reduce government multilingualism and promote English acquisition. Recent legislative initiatives include:

Oklahoma: Rep. Randy Terrill has introduced H.J.R. 1042, legislation that would make English the official language of Oklahoma. If passed by the House and Senate, the measure would appear on the November general election ballot.

Pennsylvania: Rep. Scott Perry has introduced H.B. 64, legislation that would make English the official language of Pennsylvania. As you may recall, the Pennsylvania House voted to make English the official language of the state in 2006, but the measure was not acted upon by the Senate.

South Dakota: Sen. Larry Rhoden and more than 25 of his colleagues introduced S.J.R. 2, legislation that would strengthen the state’s existing official English law. If passed by the House and Senate, the measure would be put in front of South Dakota voters.

Tennessee: Senator Bill Ketron has introduced S.B. 11, legislation that would strengthen the state’s official English law by requiring that most driver’s license examinations be conducted in English.

Washington: Representatives Jim McCune and Larry Haler have introduced H.B. 1645 to make English the official language of the state.

U.S. English, Inc. is the nation's oldest and largest non-partisan citizens' action group dedicated to preserving the unifying role of the English language in the United States. Founded in 1983 by the late Sen. S.I. Hayakawa of California, U.S. English, Inc. ( www.usenglish.org ) now has more than 2 million members.